6:13 pm - Fri, Jul 25, 2014
2 notes
Goodbye, America: A Frustrated Young College-Grad Immigrant Returns to Mexico

“I used to love this country, so I used to have a flag,” he says. “I always wanted to be an American, but things just didn’t work out.”

Jorge, age thirty-two, will leave Seattle in a few hours, bound for Mexico. He overstayed a tourist visa as a teenager and has lived in the country illegally since. But he’s grown tired of looking for opportunity. The landlord pats him on the shoulder and says “suerte”, good luck in Spanish.

…

He came here alone and lived with an uncle in the suburbs of Los Angeles during high school. His dad helped to pay for college in California, yet Jorge often worked full time to help cover his living expenses. He juggled jobs in fast food, construction, and at warehouses, and as result, it took him seven years to complete his degree in electrical engineering.

But it’s a degree that he still can’t use because of his illegal status.

Read about Jorge’s journey here: https://medium.com/@kuow/goodbye-america-f783540919a2

Goodbye, America: A Frustrated Young College-Grad Immigrant Returns to Mexico

“I used to love this country, so I used to have a flag,” he says. “I always wanted to be an American, but things just didn’t work out.”

Jorge, age thirty-two, will leave Seattle in a few hours, bound for Mexico. He overstayed a tourist visa as a teenager and has lived in the country illegally since. But he’s grown tired of looking for opportunity. The landlord pats him on the shoulder and says “suerte”, good luck in Spanish.

He came here alone and lived with an uncle in the suburbs of Los Angeles during high school. His dad helped to pay for college in California, yet Jorge often worked full time to help cover his living expenses. He juggled jobs in fast food, construction, and at warehouses, and as result, it took him seven years to complete his degree in electrical engineering.

But it’s a degree that he still can’t use because of his illegal status.

Read about Jorge’s journey here: https://medium.com/@kuow/goodbye-america-f783540919a2

3:40 pm
"The funny thing is, I don’t feel like I’m writing about Muslim American life,” Akhtar explains. “I feel like I’m writing about American life.”

Ayad Akhtar, winner of the 2013 Pulitzer Prize for his play “Disgraced”

Read the washingtonpost profile here: http://www.washingtonpost.com/entertainment/ayad-akhtar-on-muslim-identity-and-life-in-america/2014/07/17/29496290-05e6-11e4-bbf1-cc51275e7f8f_story.html

"The funny thing is, I don’t feel like I’m writing about Muslim American life,” Akhtar explains. “I feel like I’m writing about American life.”

Ayad Akhtar, winner of the 2013 Pulitzer Prize for his play “Disgraced”

Read the washingtonpost profile here: http://www.washingtonpost.com/entertainment/ayad-akhtar-on-muslim-identity-and-life-in-america/2014/07/17/29496290-05e6-11e4-bbf1-cc51275e7f8f_story.html

10:01 am - Fri, Jul 18, 2014
2 notes
5:28 pm - Thu, Jul 17, 2014
2 notes
Debunking Myths About Child Migrants from Central America

(Originally published by publicnewsservice)

The seemingly sudden, mass migration of thousands of Central American women and children who set off alone, risking their lives to migrate to the United States, has raised innumerable questions.

One woman who made the journey wants to shed some light on the issue. Kenia Calderon was just 11 years old when her family fled El Salvador nine years ago, after their neighborhood was overrun by gangs, crime and a general feeling of despair.

“The violence was horrible, you just didn’t feel safe,” she says. “Gang members would kidnap girls and force them into their gangs and make them sex slaves.”

Calderon says the economic and political conditions in many Central American countries and Mexico have deteriorated because of the failure of those economies to produce jobs, which in turn fueled hopelessness and violence.

Read the full story here: http://fi2w.org/2014/07/17/migrant-children-from-central-america/

Debunking Myths About Child Migrants from Central America

(Originally published by publicnewsservice)

The seemingly sudden, mass migration of thousands of Central American women and children who set off alone, risking their lives to migrate to the United States, has raised innumerable questions.

One woman who made the journey wants to shed some light on the issue. Kenia Calderon was just 11 years old when her family fled El Salvador nine years ago, after their neighborhood was overrun by gangs, crime and a general feeling of despair.

“The violence was horrible, you just didn’t feel safe,” she says. “Gang members would kidnap girls and force them into their gangs and make them sex slaves.”

Calderon says the economic and political conditions in many Central American countries and Mexico have deteriorated because of the failure of those economies to produce jobs, which in turn fueled hopelessness and violence.

Read the full story here: http://fi2w.org/2014/07/17/migrant-children-from-central-america/

5:18 pm
45 notes

democracynow:

“It’s not like people are saying, ‘Let’s go have the American dream,’” says Dana Frank, an expert on U.S. policy in Honduras, on Democracy Now! today. “We’re talking about starving to death — that’s the alternative — or being driven into gangs with tremendous sexual violence. It’s a very, very tragic situation [in Honduras], but it’s not like it tragically just happened. It’s a direct result of very conscious policies by the U.S. and Honduran governments.”

This week saw the first planeload of children deported to Honduras since President Obama vowed to speed up the removal of more than 57,000 youth who have fled to the United States from Central America in recent months.

9:57 am - Tue, Jul 15, 2014
1 note
NYC is the country’s largest city to offer a municipal ID card to all residents—including undocumented immigrants.

Mayor Bill de Blasio is one step closer to making good on a commitment he made in his State of the City speech this year, officially signing a law that will create a municipal identification card for city residents, regardless of immigration status, beginning in January 2015.

“We know of course that there a number of people who do have ID, but for those who don’t, they live a different life,” de Blasio said at Thursday’s bill signing ceremony, adding, “It’s not just bad for the individuals, it’s bad for the whole city when people don’t have that kind of inclusion. Today we’re going to change that.”

The municipal ID card is intended to help people to access city services and enter city buildings.

Officials are also negotiating with banks, stores, restaurants and cultural institutions to also recognize the municipal ID cards, but offered few examples Thursday about where the card would be accepted. It’s also not clear what the card will look like.

Read the full wnyc  story here: http://www.wnyc.org/story/coming-jan-2015-nyc-municipal-id-card/

NYC is the country’s largest city to offer a municipal ID card to all residents—including undocumented immigrants.

Mayor Bill de Blasio is one step closer to making good on a commitment he made in his State of the City speech this year, officially signing a law that will create a municipal identification card for city residents, regardless of immigration status, beginning in January 2015.

“We know of course that there a number of people who do have ID, but for those who don’t, they live a different life,” de Blasio said at Thursday’s bill signing ceremony, adding, “It’s not just bad for the individuals, it’s bad for the whole city when people don’t have that kind of inclusion. Today we’re going to change that.”

The municipal ID card is intended to help people to access city services and enter city buildings.

Officials are also negotiating with banks, stores, restaurants and cultural institutions to also recognize the municipal ID cards, but offered few examples Thursday about where the card would be accepted. It’s also not clear what the card will look like.

Read the full wnyc story here: http://www.wnyc.org/story/coming-jan-2015-nyc-municipal-id-card/

10:56 am - Tue, Jul 8, 2014
6 notes
Why Haven’t 8 Million Eligible Immigrants Become U.S. Citizens?

8 million immigrants across the country are eligible for U.S. citizenship but have not yet applied. A disproportionate number, nearly 2 million, live in New York City.

On June 30, immigration advocates highlighted the obstacles these potential new citizens face, and some possible solutions, in a roundtable event held at the headquarters of the International Rescue Committee.

…Despite the benefits of U.S. citizenship – the right to vote, run for office, hold some federal government positions, access to a U.S. passport – many eligible immigrants do not apply because of complex applications, the high cost of applying and confusion about the consequences for those who may want to retain citizenship in their country of origin.

Read the full story here: http://fi2w.org/2014/07/08/why-havent-8-million-eligible-immigrants-become-u-s-citizens/

Why Haven’t 8 Million Eligible Immigrants Become U.S. Citizens?

8 million immigrants across the country are eligible for U.S. citizenship but have not yet applied. A disproportionate number, nearly 2 million, live in New York City.

On June 30, immigration advocates highlighted the obstacles these potential new citizens face, and some possible solutions, in a roundtable event held at the headquarters of the International Rescue Committee.

…Despite the benefits of U.S. citizenship – the right to vote, run for office, hold some federal government positions, access to a U.S. passport – many eligible immigrants do not apply because of complex applications, the high cost of applying and confusion about the consequences for those who may want to retain citizenship in their country of origin.

Read the full story here: http://fi2w.org/2014/07/08/why-havent-8-million-eligible-immigrants-become-u-s-citizens/

12:45 pm - Mon, Jul 7, 2014
87 notes
micropolisnyc:

The most commonly spoken languages in America other than English or Spanish. Surprising to see German in so many states — and check out Tagalog and Navajo in the southwest.

micropolisnyc:

The most commonly spoken languages in America other than English or Spanish. Surprising to see German in so many states — and check out Tagalog and Navajo in the southwest.

(via mykwaze)

7:29 am - Fri, Jun 20, 2014
1 note
In new art exhibit “Tyranny” 25 Dominican artists reflects on the abuses and violence inflicted by president Rafael Leónidas Trujillo Molina.

Even though Trujillo’s nearly 30-year reign of terror ended in 1961, the impact continues to be felt, reports Sherry Mazzocchi of Manhattan Times.

   “”El Jefe” demanded total and complete loyalty. Infractions, real or imagined, were met with swift and brutal retaliation. He was also known as “El Chivo,” or the Goat, for his rapacious consumption of the island’s resources, women and lives.”

Read the full story here: http://www.voicesofny.org/2014/06/art-therapy-assessing-tyrant-trujillo/?utm_source=Voices+Newsletter&utm_campaign=50821c523c-RSS_EMAIL_CAMPAIGN&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_ffee07af47-50821c523c-42323841

In new art exhibit “Tyranny” 25 Dominican artists reflects on the abuses and violence inflicted by president Rafael Leónidas Trujillo Molina.

Even though Trujillo’s nearly 30-year reign of terror ended in 1961, the impact continues to be felt, reports Sherry Mazzocchi of Manhattan Times.

“”El Jefe” demanded total and complete loyalty. Infractions, real or imagined, were met with swift and brutal retaliation. He was also known as “El Chivo,” or the Goat, for his rapacious consumption of the island’s resources, women and lives.”

Read the full story here: http://www.voicesofny.org/2014/06/art-therapy-assessing-tyrant-trujillo/?utm_source=Voices+Newsletter&utm_campaign=50821c523c-RSS_EMAIL_CAMPAIGN&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_ffee07af47-50821c523c-42323841

3:53 pm - Thu, Jun 19, 2014
19,813 notes
digg:

This is how Colombia celebrates a World Cup goal.
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